L.A. charter schools flex their educational muscles

 
Enrollment is up, and overall, standardized test scores outshine those at traditional campuses. Even the L.A. Unified board has eased its resistance.

 
Geography lesson

Roberson squeezes in one more lesson before her students leave for the day. (Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times)

 
By Mitchell Landsberg, Doug Smith and Howard Blume

January 10, 2010

 

Over the last decade, a quiet revolution took root in the nation’s second-largest school district.

Fueled by money and emboldened by clout from some of the city’s most powerful figures, charter schools began a period of explosive growth that has challenged the status quo in the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Today, Los Angeles is home to more than 160 charter schools, far more than any other U.S. city. Charter enrollment is up nearly 19% this year from last, while enrollment in traditional L.A. public schools is down. And a once-hostile school board has become increasingly charter-friendly, despite resistance from the teachers union. In September, the board agreed to let charters bid on potentially hundreds of existing campuses and on all 50 of its planned new schools.

 
Read more.  Article provided by Cruz Rochez
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